Concord Museum-New Exhibit!

Portrait of Bill McKibben, author and activist. photo ©Nancie BattagliaEarly_Spring3_rlphoto by Cherrie Corey

 

Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change

 

April 12September 15, 2013
A ground-breaking exhibition exploring three centuries of careful observation of seasonal natural phenomena in Concord.

In Concord, Massachusetts, spring is coming earlier. Using plant flowering data collected by one of Concord’s most famous residents, Henry Thoreau, from 1852–1860, Boston University biology professor Richard Primack and his team of graduate students have found that,  on average,  spring flowers in Concord bloomed a full twenty days earlier in 2012 than in Thoreau’s time—and their statistics clearly show a close relationship between flowering times and rising winter and spring temperatures.

Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change
, a ground-breaking exhibition at the Concord Museum from April 12 through September 15, 2013, explores three centuries of careful observation of seasonal natural phenomena in Concord, a pool of data on the relationship between climate and biology that is essentially without parallel in North America. The exhibition also provides an extraordinary opportunity to examine the Concord Museum’s renowned Thoreau collection that includes the desk on which Thoreau wrote Walden, together with examples of his original field notes, journal recordings, seasonal charts, and botanical specimens. This material has never before been exhibited together.

 

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One Response to Concord Museum-New Exhibit!

  1. Hilda Parrott says:

    it’s an unbelievable exhibit and uniquely displayed, a must see!

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